Mila Paints On Mt Lemmon

Last Saturday, Mila and I went out to the woods.  We took along some snacks and some paint.  We went to a mystery location on Mt Lemmon and found a suitable place to leave our treasures behind.  It was a nice little ledge behind a small tree.

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Then we each painted several small rocks and arranged them for future explorers to find and wonder about.

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I somehow neglected to get a photo of her painting, but here is proof that she did.

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5 thoughts on “Mila Paints On Mt Lemmon

  1. One man’s so-called “treasure” is another man’s litter. I’d be pissed if I went out on a hike to some remote location and found a bunch of painted stones left like trash laying around. Aside from spoiling the pristinity of the natural environment, around my neck of the woods such thoughtlessness might cost the critically endangered California condor its life.

    • But, if it were a painting of a swordfish done directly on the unmoveable rock thousands of years ago, you would wax philosophical about it and take photos in awe with your camera made from petroleum products and shipped across the ocean from China, not even noticing that the cave had been unnaturally paved with flat stones by white people. Irony aside, I would like to know how this would endanger a condor.

      • Any reasonable person can clearly see the huge difference in value between an archaeological site from a lost culture documented to be thousands of years in use by humans and the idle doodlings of a modern misled child done illegally.

        “your camera made from petroleum products and shipped across the ocean from China”

        Well this is comical. As opposed to the cameras that took all the photos on your blog? And because you use nothing made from petroleum? Or imported from overseas?

        Your entire blog depends on petroleum products and shipments from overseas, as does your life so far as a person can glean from the content you have posted.

        “not even noticing that the cave had been unnaturally paved with flat stones by white people.”

        All paving, by definition, is unnatural.

  2. The “difference in value” you speak of is purely subjective. I make no judgement of others based on their use of petroleum products unless they self-righteously preach at me from an imaginary pedestal of innocence. Not only paving, but everything done by humans is natural, because we are part of nature. Now, if you please, I really would like to know the actual facts behind your comment about the Condor. You see, subjectively, I would prefer a world in which they exist, even though, objectively it makes no difference at all.

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